Education/Teaching
 
  We believe that protecting the environment goes hand in hand with education. The young people of today are the citizens of tomorrow and will have much to deal with as environmental pressures increase. Our programme aims to be a link between Moheli and the wider world, introducing young people to theories of conservation, sustainable development and the English language, and inspire them to go into further education. It is important that the future generation of Moheli can access higher education. Indeed, unsustainable, money-driven development of the island could lead to irreversible damage to the environment and the cultural heritage of the islands.  History shows that unimpeded development can lead to environmental catastrophes and cultural clashes.
 
 The race for development has already started and caused considerable damage which maybe irreparable now. For Moheli, development means access to external goods and technology, such as medication, electricity, TV, cars, comforts.... all these things are costly, and involve, unfortunately, the use of unsustainable practices to earn money. The island’s primary forest is disappearing, originally because of the need for land for agriculture and now for the trade in precious tropical wood- sold at a low price to unscrupulous merchants. Industrial fishing vessels empty the sea of fish, shark fins, sea cucumbers and turtles. Corals and shells are still collected and sold.
 
 
 
 
 
The Comoros are not to blame for this. Modern societies are very good at promoting unnecessary needs to new areas in an effort to expand their market. Sadly Moheli and the Comoros, untouched until recently, are no exception to this and seem to want to develop rapidly. We believe that the only chance for Moheli to develop sustainably is to show the future generation the unforeseen effects development can have and to make them aware of the mistakes of the past. It is important to underline that rapid, uncontrolled development based on simple exploitation of natural resources may bring money in fast but only to a minority of the people and will not last. Indeed, most of the population rely on primary production and the prosperity of the tropical environment. Destroying it would be a humanitarian catastrophe as well as an ecological one. Comoros are biologically and culturally rich and it would be a worldwide loss if this was allowed to disappear.
 
 We believe that computer literacy and English language will help the Comoros to access different branches of the economic market, join fair/eco trade companies, promote ecological tourism and market their resources in a more economical, environmental and sustainable way. The potential of Comoros is enormous with numerous unspoiled beaches, extensive coral reefs, amazing wildlife and tropical forests. Comoros have nothing to envy from the better-known islands in the Indian Ocean such as the Seychelles, Mauritius or the Maldives. The Comoros are a pearl in peril and need the population to react soon in order to preserve its beauty and its potential.
 
 Their future is not in our hands but we would like to try to help the new generation make up their own mind to take care of their own future.
 
Teaching at Moidjio
 
 We believe that protecting the environment goes hand in hand with education. The young people of today are the citizens of tomorrow and will have much to deal with as environmental pressures increase. Our programme aims to be a link between Moheli and the wider world, introducing young people to theories of conservation, sustainable development and the English language, and inspire them to go into further education. It is important that the future generation of Moheli can access higher education. Indeed, unsustainable, money-driven development of the island could lead to irreversible damage to the environment and the cultural heritage of the islands.
 
 History shows that unimpeded development can lead to environmental catastrophes and cultural clashes.
The race for development has already started and caused considerable damage which maybe irreparable now. For Moheli, development means access to external goods and technology, such as medication, electricity, TV, cars, comforts.... all these things are costly, and involve, unfortunately, the use of unsustainable practices to earn money. 
 
 The island’s primary forest is disappearing, originally because of the need for land for agriculture and now for the trade in precious tropical wood- sold at a low price to unscrupulous merchants. Industrial fishing vessels empty the sea of fish, shark fins, sea cucumbers and turtles. Corals and shells are still collected and sold. The Comoros are not to blame for this. Modern societies are very good at promoting unnecessary needs to new areas in an effort to expand their market. Sadly Moheli and the Comoros, untouched until recently, are no exception to this and seem to want to develop rapidly. 
 
 We believe that the only chance for Moheli to develop sustainably is to show the future generation the unforeseen effects development can have and to make them aware of the mistakes of the past. It is important to underline that rapid, uncontrolled development based on simple exploitation of natural resources may bring money in fast but only to a minority of the people and will not last. Indeed, most of the population rely on primary production and the prosperity of the tropical environment. Destroying it would be a humanitarian catastrophe as well as an ecological one. Comoros are biologically and culturally rich and it would be a worldwide loss if this was allowed to disappear. 
 
 We believe that computer literacy and English language will help the Comoros to access different branches of the economic market, join fair/eco trade companies, promote ecological tourism and market their resources in a more economical, environmental and sustainable way. The potential of Comoros is enormous with numerous unspoiled beaches, extensive coral reefs, amazing wildlife and tropical forests. Comoros have nothing to envy from the better-known islands in the Indian Ocean such as the Seychelles, Mauritius or the Maldives. The Comoros are a pearl in peril and need the population to react soon in order to preserve its beauty and its potential.
 
Their future is not in our hands but we would like to try to help the new generation make up their own mind to take care of their own future.
 
 
 
 
 

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