Terrestrial mammals of Comoros
Lemur Mongoose (Eulemur mongoz)
Lemur mongoz are native of North West Madagascar. They are thought to beexclusively herbivorous, a diet that includes fruits, flower, nectar, sieve, seeds and leaves. Lemur Mongoz are thought to have been introduce to the Comoros and 2 theories are confronting each other. One says that the Lemurs have been introduce by pirates, using them as pet and fresh meet to carry around and the other one, more romantic, says that they've been travelling on floating logs from Madagascar to Comoros (300 km away). It distribution on Moheli is widespread and we are now trying to estimate it abundance. Lemur Mongoz are living in small groups, generally a couple and their sibling from 2 to 6 individuals. They tend to show cathemeral behaviour, alternatively being diurnal during the wet season and nocturnal during the dry one. Groups show repetitive feeding behaviour day after day for a given season and seems to always follow the same trails. They are very territorial and protect their food source from competitive groups by confronting them with vocal displays. Territories seem to be affiliated to food and sometime just a tree is source of conflict and covetousness. Armful fights between groups are very rare but are sometimes physical. Lemurs mongoose are nesting high up in trees (Baobab, mango trees...) not far from their food supply. The nest is composed of branches and leaves, lemurs are sleeping individually or in group but not too far from each other within a group. They are sleeping seated and tail between legs and arms. We have also observed the building of temporary camps to spend the night or few days in an area food rich.
Livingstone's fruit bat (Pteropus livingstonii)
 
Livingstone's fruit bat (Pteropus livingstonii), also called the Comoro flying fox, is a megabat in the genus of Pteropus.
Comorian species. The forest is over 200 meters (500 meters) in Anjouan, the destruction of the bat population. As of 2003, the total population was estimated at 1,200 individuals.Other threats to the bats' survival include storms, hunting, and their struggles.It is an Old World fruit bat found only in the Comoros islands of the western Indian Ocean.
Seychelles' fruit bat (Pteropus seychellensis)

The Seychelles fruit bat or Seychelles flying fox (Pteropus seychellensis) is a megabat found on the granitic islands of Seychelles, and on the Comoros and Mafia Island. It is a significant component of the ecosystems for the islands, dispersing the seeds of many tree species.

The tailless tenrec (Tenrec ecaudatus)
The tailless tenrec (Tenrec ecaudatus), also known as the common tenrec, is a species of mammal in the family Tenrecidae. It is the only member of the genus Tenrec. Native to Madagascar, it is also found in the Comoros, Mauritius, Réunion, and Seychelles, where it has been introduced.The tailless tenrec is the largest land-dwelling species of the tenrec family, Tenrecidae. It is 26 to 39 cm  in length and weighs 1.5 to 2.5 kg. It has medium-sized, coarse grey to reddish-grey fur and long, sharp spines along its body. It not only eats small invertebrates among leaves, but also scavenges and hunts frogs and mice. It shelters in a nest of grass and leaves under a rock, log or bush by day. It gives birth to a litter of as many as 32 young, with an average litter between 15-20 after a gestation of 50–60 days; when young, they have a black-and-white striped appearance.

The small Indian civet (Viverricula indica)

The small Indian civet (Viverricula indica) is a civet native to South and Southeast Asia. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List because of its widespread distribution, widespread habitat use and healthy populations living in agricultural and secondary landscapes of many range states.

The small Indian civet (Viverricula indica)

The small Indian civet (Viverricula indica) is a civet native to South and Southeast Asia. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List because of its widespread distribution, widespread habitat use and healthy populations living in agricultural and secondary landscapes of many range states.

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